Spintronics is essential in creating low-power operations that can also work as part of quantum computing. The design has been built with a reduce graphene oxide layer. This allows scientists to enhance spin injection, and fine tune the conductivity of the electrons as needed.

“Scientists from the University of Texas at San Antonio have created a new type of graphene-based logic device. Experts believe this new technology could help to dramatically improve the energy efficiency of devices that rely on batteries in order to function, including computers and smartphones.
 
In order to achieve this goal, scientists are employing the study of electrons and their quantum mechanical property called spin. This field is known as spintronics, and is essential in creating low-power operations that can also work as part of quantum computing.
 
Normally, devices are powered by electrons and the electronic charge they carry. However, things are a little different when it comes to spintronics; in this case, scientists use the spinning of the electrons themselves as a way to generate power. That means devices need fewer electrons to operate at peak performance.
 
In order for their technology to work effectively, scientists had to find a way to effectively capture spin and harness it for their purposes — and that meant finding a way to prevent spin loss.
 
The solution to spin loss involved a concept known as ‘zero power carbon interconnect.’ Scientists took nanomaterials and used them as the tunnel barrier and the spin transport channel. Nanomaterials are made up of a 2D layer of carbon atoms that is just a mere few nanometers in width; more importantly, the nanomaterials mark the point of contact where spin injection enters a specific device.
 
The new design has been built with a reduce graphene oxide layer. This allows scientists to enhance spin injection, and fine tune the conductivity of the electrons as needed.”

 
Read full story at Powering Tech Devices With The Help Of Spintronics

Source: In Compliance Mag

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