Using a graphene enhanced concrete additive changes the strength and weight aspects of the concrete. The graphene enhanced concrete additive is being developed by Canadian company Zen Graphene Solutions.

“Graphene represents a conceptually new class of material that is regarded as 2D having length and width, the third dimension, height, is considered to be zero….
 
After reviewing technical data of the Albany Graphite tailings material it was observed that the tailings chemical and physical properties are consistent with the requirements for it to be used in concrete. In collaboration with the university of Toronto and the University of British Columbia, ZEN has been developing a graphene enhanced concrete additive, that has “the potential to increase the strength of the concrete by 40%”.
 
The additive also will have the potential to reduce the amount of concrete required, as well as making the concrete more durable to freeze-thaw cycles and salt corrosion, making the concrete the perfect product relevant to the Canadian climate.
 
ZEN have just announced (May 8, 2019) they have been awarded a one million dollar reimbursement grant, that will help accelerate their enhanced concrete research development project. The grant will help the Company to achieve its goal in providing cement based products to the Ontario market, possibly by 2020.
 
Dr Francis Dube ZENs CEO commented: “This $1,000,000 reimbursement grant will accelerate ZENs innovation for graphene applications through game changing research and vibrant collaboration between industry, and academia helping to launch the next generation of products and jobs.”
 
ZEN’s challenge as a new high quality supplier is to define and prioritize markets and offer the best value and creation potential by working in collaboration alongside researchers in the industry and in academia. ZEN is actively collaborating with 22 industrial end users and 10 Canadian universities.”

 
Read full article The road to graphene enhanced concrete just got faster

Source: Investor Intel

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