Developing 2D Materials. Graphene’s conductivity is most similar to that of metals, making graphene difficult to use in logical circuit elements. At the same time, it easily forms ripples and is unstable as a separate free film. Russian researchers have been looking to solve this problem.

“Researching 2D materials is a very promising area in modern material science. These materials are very thin (often less than 1 nm). Thus, they can be used to create layered heterostructures that find application in modern electronics – from transistors to sensors, solar cells and LEDs.
 
Scientists at the National University of Science and Technology MISiS (NUST MISiS) are actively researching the technology to produce many types of two-dimensional nanomaterials, as well as the material’s properties. It’s all about the thin layer.
 
The main distinction of 2D materials is that all of their atoms are arranged in the surface layer. In terms of chemistry and crystallography, this means they have numerous unsaturated, uncompensated (dangling) bonds. This results in increased chemical reactivity of these materials, making them significantly different from bulk-layered materials in terms of properties. Dangling bonds allow altering the materials’ functions via surface engineering.
 
Graphene is the most popular 2D material. The discovery of graphene in 2010 resulted in a Nobel Prize in Physics. Graphene possesses high electrical and thermal conductivity and tensile strength. At the same time, it easily forms ripples and is unstable as a separate free film.
 
This problem was solved by introducing new techniques to create “reinforced” (metal-clad) (graphene. Moreover, researchers developed the technology to produce large, defect-free films of graphene that are used as transparent electrodes for various devices. They also developed methods to obtain graphene oxide flakes that are now being implemented as functional fillers for polymer composites.
 
Graphene’s conductivity is most similar to that of metals, making graphene difficult to use in logical circuit elements. That is why scientists are researching other 2D materials, such as transitional metal chalcogenides, for use in electronics and sensors. These materials have semiconducting properties and differ in conductivity type….”

 
Read the full story Russian Scientists Make Progress Developing Innovative 2D Materials

Source: SputnikNews

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